Reducing Chronic Inflammation for Better Health

Inflammation has been shown to be a factor in a number of chronic illnesses, including type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, asthma and Alzheimer’s.  Researchers are still investigating the causes and processes involved, but it has become apparent that our lifestyle choices have a huge role to play in the development, management, and prevention of disease. To me, this is empowering. Our health is not singularly predetermined by genetics, as once thought, but we actually have some control over how we feel.

First, let’s take a moment to appreciate our bodies and all that they do for us. Even though things may go awry, inflammation is really the body trying to protect us. When there is a perceived threat, the immune system kicks into gear to try and localize the injury and prevent greater damage. This activation can be caused by a number of things, including pathogens, allergens, stress, injury, toxins or free radicals.

So if inflammation is meant to be helpful, then why are we interested in reducing it? The danger comes from unresolved, chronic inflammation. Our inflammatory response is mean to be acute - reacting to the threat, activating the necessary pathways, and then resolving the issue and returning to normal, or homeostasis. When the inflammation is not resolved, or the perceived threat does not go away, our body stays in this constant state of immune activation and inflammation. This may be due to an underlying medical issue such as infection or autoimmune condition, or it may be related to environmental toxins, food allergies or sensitivities, or even stress. This ongoing inflammatory response can damage tissues and contribute to many common symptoms, including eczema, fatigue, brain fog, weight gain and even mood disorders.

So what can we do? It is reassuring to know there are changes we can make and daily habits we can create that will help reduce inflammation and support the bodies’ natural healing processes.

 
 

1. Take a look at your food. Everything we eat has the potential to help us or hurt us. Some foods trigger the inflammatory cascade in our body, others can help to calm and reduce inflammation. An anti-inflammatory diet is a based on real, whole, unprocessed food without toxins and added chemicals. It includes lots of different plant foods, including vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices. It is low in sugar, alcohol, processed foods, refined grains, damaged fats and preserved meats.  

2. Don’t stress. When we experience stress, whether real or perceived, it has physiological effects on the brain and body, one of which can be to activate the inflammatory response.  Again, this reaction is meant to protect us. Think of fight or flight - we run from the bear that’s chasing us, and either get away or get killed. We fight the bear, and either win or get killed. In either scenario, the stressor goes away and the issue is resolved, allowing the body to return to its normal state (assuming the bear didn’t kill us).  However in modern life, this is often no longer the case. Work, relationships, constant stimulation and pressures, can keep our stress response constantly activated, and this can lead to both mental and physical stress related diseases. Daily stress reduction techniques such as conscious breath work, meditation and journaling can be hugely beneficial to our health.  

3. Move your body. It has been said that sitting is the new smoking. We spend so much time driving, at our desks, looking at our phones and not moving, and our bodies are suffering. It doesn’t mean you need to go to a crazy hard spin class or high intensity workout, especially if you’re already experiencing high levels of inflammation.  Start by just trying to move more regularly, throughout your day. Studies show that as little as 20 minutes a day can reduce inflammatory markers. Take a walk at lunch. Have a dance party while you’re making dinner. If you work at a desk, stand up and stretch every hour. Take the stairs, park farther away, go for a bike ride, and find little ways to incorporate more movement into your day. 

 

There are a number of other lifestyle factors that impact our levels of inflammation, including sleep habits, smoking, and medication. While we can’t live in a bubble and not everything is within our control, many things are, and learning how to manage our health is empowering and necessary.

 

Never Make a Boring Salad Again

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Our bodies do a lot of work when we consume food. They release hormones, secrete enzymes, move muscles, and communicate to other cells to digest the food, assimilate nutrients, and store energy from our meal. All of this happens without any conscious participation from us. This happens thanks to the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). The ANS has three branches, enteric, sympathetic, and parasympathetic. We won't get into the enteric nervous system now, but its also really important for digestion.

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Herbs (and spices, but that's for another time) are not only a wonderful way to flavor your food, they are really nutrient dense, offering great health benefits in a relatively small package. Unless you make your own food at home, you may not be getting many herbs in your diet. Yet another reason why cooking your own food is a good idea. Whether you choose to use fresh or dried herbs depends on the recipe. Most often, the flavor and health benefits will be higher in fresh herbs, but using dried is better than none at all if that's all you have. We grow a lot of herbs at home, but I always have dried herbs on hand as well, and try to incorporate them into our food as much as possible. Just remember when using fresh herbs, they can lose some of their nutritional benefits if overcooked, so add them to a recipe toward the end and avoid a lot of heat.

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Looking for quick and healthy breakfast ideas? I got you covered. 

I know that trying to make a quick, healthy meal in the morning and still get out the door on time can be tricky.  So I've put together my top 5 quick and healthy breakfasts for you. These are not meant to be "On-the-go" meals, as I encourage you to eat mindfully, sitting and enjoying rather than taking rushed bites in your car at red lights.  Instead, treat yourself to a few extra minutes in the morning to nourish yourself before the busy day takes over. Try it for a week and see how you feel! 

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Tacos are super easy to make.  Get some tortillas (corn or flour, depending on any food sensitivities) and choose your fillings.  And leftovers make a great bowl for lunch the next day served over salad greens.  Essentially, you can pick and choose a variety of ingredients from the following categories. Here are some examples:

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